JOHN HARDY CELEBRATES ARTIST TERESITA FERNÁNDEZ DURING ART BASEL

JOHN HARDY CELEBRATES ARTIST TERESITA FERNÁNDEZ DURING ART BASEL

John Hardy Jewelry CEO, Damien Dernoncourt, Head Designer and Creative Director, Guy Bedarida and Lehmann Maupin Gallery Partners, Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin, joined W Magazine’s Stefano Tonchi and Armand Limnander in hosting a cocktail party in honor of celebrated artist Teresita Fernández. The event, held on Tuesday, November 29th at the New World Center building’s Rooftop Garden in Miami Beach, celebrated Teresita’s appointment to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts and her recent artist residency at the John Hardy compound in Bali.

As first participant of our Artist Residency Program, Teresita revealed a stunning piece of art at the event. Entitled Silver Screen/30 Dissolves, 2011, it comprises of 30 intaglio etchings on metal, displayed in a calendar-grid, each corresponding to the different phases of the waxing and waning moon over a month’s time.

Teresita says of the project, “During my John Hardy Residency, I wanted to incorporate the silver not just as a physical material but also to look at it conceptually. I researched and developed ideas that dealt with the historical connection between silver and the moon and the way the lunar calendar is presently used in Bali. The moon has, since ancient times, always been a source of fascination, and the associations with femininity, imagination, memory, changeability, moods, imagery, power and intelligence are endless. I took thousands of photographs of nocturnal images shot indirectly on surfaces of high-polished, convex forms made of the recycled hammered silvered that John Hardy uses for much of their jewelry. The final piece is a conceptual layering of silver image over silver surface. Each changing, mirror-like image also reflects light and becomes illuminated, indirectly borrowing atmospheric light in the same way that the moon borrows light from the sun. The images will inevitably change over time, darkening like a slow dissolve as the metal begins to change color.”